NRCP

NRCP 68 – OFFERS OF JUDGMENT

RULE 68. OFFERS OF JUDGMENT

  • (a) The Offer. At any time more than 10 days before trial, any party may serve an offer in writing to allow judgment to be taken in accordance with its terms and conditions.

    (b) Apportioned Conditional Offers. An apportioned offer of judgment to more than one party may be conditioned upon the acceptance by all parties to whom the offer is directed.

    (c) Joint Unapportioned Offers.

    (1) Multiple Offerors. A joint offer may be made by multiple offerors.

    (2) Offers to Multiple Defendants. An offer made to multiple defendants will invoke the penalties of this rule only if (A) there is a single common theory of liability against all the offeree defendants, such as where the liability of some is entirely derivative of the others or where the liability of all is derivative of common acts by another, and (B) the same entity, person or group is authorized to decide whether to settle the claims against the offerees.

    (3) Offers to Multiple Plaintiffs. An offer made to multiple plaintiffs will invoke the penalties of this rule only if (A) the damages claimed by all the offeree plaintiffs are solely derivative, such as that the damages claimed by some offerees are entirely derivative of an injury to the others or that the damages claimed by all offerees are derivative of an injury to another, and (B) the same entity, person or group is authorized to decide whether to settle the claims of the offerees.

    (d) Judgment Entered Upon Acceptance. If within 10 days after the service of the offer, the offeree serves written notice that the offer is accepted, either party may then file the offer and notice of acceptance together with proof of service. The clerk shall enter judgment accordingly. The court shall allow costs in accordance with NRS 18.110 unless the terms of the offer preclude a separate award of costs. Any judgment entered pursuant to this section shall be expressly designated a compromise settlement. At his option, a defendant may within a reasonable time pay the amount of the offer and obtain a dismissal of the claim, rather than a judgment.

    (e) Failure to Accept Offer. If the offer is not accepted within 10 days after service, it shall be considered rejected by the offeree and deemed withdrawn by the offeror. Evidence of the offer is not admissible except in a proceeding to determine costs and fees. The fact that an offer is made but not accepted does not preclude a subsequent offer. With offers to multiple offerees, each offeree may serve a separate acceptance of the apportioned offer, but if the offer is not accepted by all offerees, the action shall proceed as to all. Any offeree who fails to accept the offer may be subject to the penalties of this rule.

    (f) Penalties for Rejection of Offer. If the offeree rejects an offer and fails to obtain a more favorable judgment,

    (1) the offeree cannot recover any costs or attorney’s fees and shall not recover interest for the period after the service of the offer and before the judgment; and

    (2) the offeree shall pay the offeror’s post-offer costs, applicable interest on the judgment from the time of the offer to the time of entry of the judgment and reasonable attorney’s fees, if any be allowed, actually incurred by the offeror from the time of the offer. If the offeror’s attorney is collecting a contingent fee, the amount of any attorney’s fees awarded to the party for whom the offer is made must be deducted from that contingent fee.

    (g) How Costs Are Considered. To invoke the penalties of this rule, the court must determine if the offeree failed to obtain a more favorable judgment. Where the offer provided that costs would be added by the court, the court must compare the amount of the offer with the principal amount of the judgment, without inclusion of costs. Where a defendant made an offer in a set amount which precluded a separate award of costs, the court must compare the amount of the offer together with the offeree’s pre-offer taxable costs with the principal amount of the judgment.

    (h) Offers After Determination of Liability. When the liability of one party to another has been determined by verdict, order or judgment, but the amount or extent of the liability remains to be determined by further proceedings, the party adjudged liable may make an offer of judgment, which shall have the same effect as an offer made before trial if it is served within a reasonable time not less than 10 days prior to the commencement of hearings to determine the amount or extent of liability.

    [Replaced; effective October 27, 1998.]

  • Drafter’s Note

    2004 Amendment

    The Nevada rule was replaced in 1998. It is substantially different from the federal rule.